Is my hard work really going to pay off?

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Recently, Forbes Magazine featured a story titled, “Why Millennial Women Are Burning Out At Work By 30.” I am nowhere near 30 but I still found this alarming, and somewhat familiar. Busy young women are turning to prescription drugs and therapy just to get through their work days. I’m a Millennial Woman, and I have worked really hard to put myself in a position to have a successful career. Now, all of a sudden, I find out that all this hard work might be putting me at risk, and not pay off in the long run! My dad always told me that dedication and tenacity will reap rewards, but now I am not so sure.

The article points out the fact that women hold the majority of entry-level jobs and as you look up the corporate ladder, the percentage of women in these higher positions begins to decrease. Women have dealt with the glass ceiling for decades, but it’s surprising that in 2011 there remains such a disparity. So why is this? Apparently, we need to learn how to relax. What? Millennial Women have been so successful at managing activities and schedules throughout high school and college that by the time they get to their first jobs they are disappointed and exhausted.

Re-lax (verb): to chill out, calm down and take a break. Below are ideas that most people, and not just us Millennial Women, should consider to help avoid burnout:

1) Go eat lunch and actually just eat lunch! Take a break just because you need time to unwind.

2) Exercise. Go on a run or walk during working hours to help relieve some of that tension.

3) Have a hobby that is truly relaxing and doesn’t create more “work” for the weekends. Take up skiing or read more fiction.

Millennial Women are more than capable of success despite this burnout claim. I believe it is important to take care of yourself no matter who you are or where you work. Over the years, people have forgotten the importance of putting themselves first every once in a while. I am by no means going to stop working hard, but I might try to pencil in a little more “me” time during the work week. I’m sure my work productivity will increase as a result.

 

Photo credit to Danilo Rizzuti

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